There’s meddling afoot!

Having written newsletters for years, I’m trying to get the hang of writing blogs – there’s definitely a difference!

Whilst I’m having to adapt my writing style, the one thing that hasn’t changed is politicians meddling in areas that there really don’t understand very well. 

As I get older (can I say that?) the more it seems to me that the people who run the country (from a political point of view) come from a galaxy, far, far away. They certainly don’t live in the world that I or many of the other business people that I know, live in.

Just looking at employment law and regulation, the current government, like so many recent governments before them, seem obsessed with listening to idiotic ideas, from people who must live on a completely different planet.

We’ve recently had “no-fault dismissals“, “protected conversations” and the surrender of employment rights in return for shares. All of which are seem to have little real purpose and are surrounded by unclear rules and lots (and I mean lots) of ambiguity.

Unbeknown to politicians you can dismiss people fairly, even for poor performance and yes, you CAN have open conversations with employees and even dismiss employees under an agreement which prevents them from taking you to an Employment Tribunal!

The idea of workers surrendering their rights is a weird one and employers adopting this approach (a rare breed I fancy) will find that this may say a lot more about them than their employees.

When will politicians realise that their constant meddling simply feeds the “claim culture” that they apparently abhor and are supposedly seeking to address.

My guess is that they either do this deliberately (it does create a lot of work) or they simply can’t resist the opportunity for a bit of political posturing and positioning.

So what would be useful for 2013 and beyond?

  • Stop meddling and stop changing the rules every time you need some business friendly publicity. Believe it or not most business can understand rules and regulations and can actually work quite effectively in accordance with them (most of the time) – just give them the chance 
  • Introduce a step change in the Employment Tribunal system by introducing a legally qualified claim assessment panel to review the validity of claims being made after the employer response (ET3) has been received. Throw out spurious claims and only allow in legitimate claims with a reasonable chance of success (allow an appeal) and stop the time wasters and chancers who are looking for a quick pay-off rather than preventing those with legitimate claims by putting up barriers to justice
  • ANY FINALLY AND MOST IMPORTANTLY – Give the country some direction, some vision, some passion – I’ve never experienced a bunch of leaders so devoid of ideas and inspiration. The Prime Minister needs to realise that he is the CEO of UK plc and to act accordingly – stop the knee jerking and blame – create some ambition, set some challenges and provide the infrastructure to support those ambitions so that UK plc can realise its full potential – and believe me it has loads of potential

Contrary to popular belief, the UK is not heavily regulated in terms of employment legislation,government and other interested parties just want us to think so.

Beginning on 1st January 2013 please allow business to work within a stable framework, which is clear and easy to understand – stop playing politics – all you do is make things worse.

Start doing your job by inspiring the country with some compelling vision and leadership.

Marry Christmas and a Happy New Year –

Marmaduke

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